Adverse Childhood Experiences

Adverse Childhood Experiences
Overview, Response Strategies, and Integral Theory
By Heather Larkin and John Records
Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have been involved in an ongoing collaboration with Kaiser Permanente’s Department of Preventive Medicine, where they have designed a large study exploring the role of “adverse childhood experiences” (ACEs) on social and health outcomes later in life. Integral Theory is used to explain ACEs as an underlying syndrome, and an Integral Restorative Process is presented as a useful and flexible intervention model to guide a comprehensive and effective response.
Format
PDF
354.7 KB
Published: 09-01-2007
Length: 25 Pages
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Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have been involved in an ongoing collaboration with Kaiser Permanente’s Department of Preventive Medicine, where they have designed a large and epidemiologically sound study exploring the role of “adverse childhood experiences” (ACEs) on social and health outcomes later in life. This research brings a distinct and compelling relationship between ACEs, health risk behaviors, and physical and mental health into awareness. This article outlines these research findings, pointing also to the role of ACEs in homelessness and criminal justice involvement and addressing service delivery implications. Integral Theory is used to explain ACEs as an underlying syndrome, and Integral Restorative Processes is presented as a useful and flexible intervention model to guide a comprehensive and effective response.